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Tag: Lima

Donde Peruco

Seafood / ceviche, Northern Peruvian (norteña)
(4 / 5)
$$
review date: 12/24/2014
+51 1 4491030
Calle María Elena Moyano (La Merced) 178, Santiago de Surco 15038, Perú

 
 

My husband’s sister Susi and brother-in-law David brought us to Donde Peruco for Christmas Eve lunch, saying that if we couldn’t get up to my husband’s northern hometown of Piura, Donde Peruco had some good norteña dishes, and some great seafood too.

The restaurant’s located on a side street in Surco, Lima’s largest district. Mistura and Apega signs hang prominently outside the restaurant, proclaiming the restaurant’s participation in the country’s largest food festival (and by association, its quality).

Outside, the small, winding street was packed with cars (and attendants looking to help you park for a few nuevo soles); but the restaurant’s interior – while smallish – had a rustic, breezy feel. There was a little alcove bar which looked cozy.

The server was extremely polite, and swiftly served us beers, and a pitcher of sweet, clove-y chicha morada. We munched on the provided cancha (fried maize kernels) and chifles (plantain chips), then started with leche de tigre – for which chefs and home cooks alike have their own special recipe. Often this consists of strained ceviche marinade, while sometimes it is made on its own; still others use a combination of these two. Donde Peruco’s, to me, was more like a ceviche in a glass, with extra marinade – but I’m not complaining. The tart creaminess of the marinade, the inimitable floral, tangy-sweet Peruvian lime, fresh sea bass, and crisp red onion… my mouth waters just thinking about it, and I’m not even exaggerating.

This led into our main dishes, the first of which was a mild ceviche de pescado (which was nearly identical to the leche de tigre, I think). I personally like my ceviche much spicier, but it was still delicious.

The lomo saltado was incredible. Those who’ve had it before may think this phrase is an oxymoron! It’s a simple dish, certainly – strips of beef and bell pepper, with a lot of garlic and a hint of soy sauce, a nod to the many Asian influences in Peruvian cuisine. But the beef was filet mignon-tender, the sauce so flavorful, with just the right balance of salt and garlic. Even my husband said it was the best he’d ever had.

We also shared a plate of jalea, a plate of battered fried seafood and yucca, with homemade mayonnaise for dipping. Hot, light, crisp… yum.

Our arroz con mariscos had a dark, rich seafood sauce, with shrimp, squid, calamari, mussels, and a paella-like rice. It was very good.

We also sampled a few of the norteño dishes. I’d never had seco de chabelo before, and it was… well, interesting. It was like smashed tostones with fresh dried beef (charqui, or jerky), and chifles stuck in the top. There’s no question it was well-made; I’m just on the fence about tostones, which I find to be bland and dry. I greatly prefer ripe, moist plantains, fried to a dark caramel on the outside, and that sweet, deep yellow creaminess on the inside… well, I digress. If you’re not a fan of unripe plantains, you may want to skip this one. (My husband says that in his hometown, they do not put chifles, and they use chicha de jora to make it more moist and flavorful.)

Majado de yucca is another northern specialty. Now I’m a yucca freak, and I could pretty much eat fried yucca (with an assortment of dipping sauces of course) every day of the year. But this was similar to the seco de chabelo, only with yucca. Like the chabelo, it was very good – just not my thing.

For dessert, we went to a gelateria, though we’ll be sure to try Donde Peruco’s postres (and the arroz con pato, the one norteña dish we didn’t get to try) next time. 

For a restaurant in Lima, the prices might be considered middle of the road. For American visitors, the prices are quite reasonable; almost all of the entrées are priced between $8 and $9 American dollars.

Donde Peruco is simply an excellent restaurant. I can’t say one negative thing about it. Every single dish was well-made, perfectly seasoned, nicely presented, and served quickly and courteously. I absolutely recommend it, and plan to go back as soon as we return to Lima.

Panchita

Criollo Peruvian cuisine

(3 / 5)

$$

review date: 1/2/2015

Menu: Facebook 

+51 1 4478272

Calle 2 de Mayo 298, Miraflores District, Lima

My husband's sweet cousin Mili brought me, my husband, daughter, and mother-in-law to Panchita for lunch. Panchita is one of renowned chef / restauranteur Gastón Acurio's casual dining restaurants, located in the Miraflores district of Lima. It has a fun vibe, with traditional ceramics and posters of Peruvian expressions throughout. The first thing you see when you walk in is the refrigerated case of marinating meats and fish, giving the impression that Acurio means to showcase the traditional criollio Peruvian food from the outset.

Our courteous server greeted the five of us immediately, and we while we perused the large menu, we ordered drinks: passionfruit and regular pisco sours, and a pitcher of chicha morada. The sours were good, with just the right amount of pisco and egg white froth. The chicha was very subtly spiced, and not too sweet; I don’t care for it personally, but my husband and daughter really liked it.

As we had walked to our table, we’d passed the huge bread oven, a red-mosaic monstrosity with a concrete wall around it. It glared with heat and promise. We were told that all the restaurant’s breads were baked in this oven, and I could not wait to try them. We were quickly served a variety of breads and condiments on a wooden tray: a large, fluffy loaf of potato bread; two round, crusty white rolls;  an unleavened bread made of beans; and another bread made of corn.

What a disappointment.  The potato bread was sweet and cottony-soft, but nearly flavorless, and reminded me distinctly of store-bought potato bread. The other breads had a nice chewy texture, but also lacked flavor, with barely a trace of the earthy stone-hearth aroma I would have expected from that oven. Even more, I was shocked to discover (after the fact) that we had been charged $7 soles per person for the one tray of bread we’d all shared, which was never even refilled! That makes $35 soles for four rolls and one four-serving loaf of bread. That’s outrageous. Though the price is on the menu, many people (especially Americans, including myself) would just assume bread was free, especially when it’s simply plunked down on your table without a comment. (Note 7/2016: apparently this “bread tax” is a common practice in restaurants; so you may wish to check the menu or ask the server at each restaurant you visit in Peru.)

We decided to share an assortment of appetizers. We began with Piqueo Doña Pancha, a sampler plate of appetizers: anticuchos de corazón; causa; chicharrón; tamal verde; choclo a la huancaína; and a papita rellena, accompanied by salsa criolla and fried sweet potato. We all agreed that each appetizer was exceptionally good. The tamal verde – moist and delicate, full of fresh cilantro flavor – was one of the best I’ve had. The anticuchos de corazón – marinated, skewered, and grilled beef hearts – stole the show: so tender, with a taste like a cross between a ribeye steak and a mild liver, and just a slight hint of game in the aftertaste. Add hot pepper paste, spices, and smoky char from the grill… simply amazing. Try them. You won’t be sorry.

Next came Jarana Criolla, or an assortment of stewed dishes which were largely created by Peruvian African slaves: olluquito (a stew made with olluco, a root vegetable that tastes to me like a cross between white potato and cabbage); ají de gallina; carapulcra (dried potato and beef jerky stew); cau cau (tripe); sangrecita (fried beef blood); patita con maní (pig’s feet with peanut); chanfainita (an organ meat stew); and frijoles con jugo y arroz (black beans with rice). All were very good, but the star was the pig’s feet – the meat was rich and sweet, and the peanut was a perfect accompaniment. However, a few of these were extremely salty, especially the beans.

We also ordered a plate of anticuchos de paiche, with tostones. Paiche is a massive South American river fish that is white and sweet, much like cod (indeed, it’s sometimes called the “cod of the Amazon”); but has a bit of chewy bite to it, making it strong enough to withstand the grill. It was marinated in lime juice, pepper paste, and spices, and cooked absolutely perfectly, plucked off the grill just at the point when it was cooked through. It was juicy, bursting with flavor, yet still delicate. This was one of the best fish dishes I’ve ever eaten, bar none – and I don’t say that lightly.

My daughter ordered a plate of pesto pasta for herself; she said it was good. I tasted it and thought it was decent. (This might work for a vegetarian, as well as the breads / condiments, and possibly the bean stews – but ask which dishes are made with meat stock; I bet most are.)

For dessert, we all shared a plate of picarones, deep-fried beignets/doughnuts made of pumpkin, sweet potato, and sweet spices like cinnamon and clove. They were fresh and light, with most of its sweetness lent by the generous pouring of miel (molasses syrup). It was a perfect end to our lunch.

The service was excellent: friendly, knowledgeable, prompt, and unobtrusive. They cheerfully obliged our every request, even when I (very annoyingly) asked to take pictures of everyone and everything. They even took pictures on each of our phones.

Overall I found Panchita provided a very good meal for a reasonable price (with the exception of the bread). The entire meal for 5 people, including drinks, came to just over $400 soles – about $130 American dollars. Now that is a bargain, even with a steep “bread tax.”

Keep in mind this is more casual fare. It’s a good place for a fun lunch or happy hour with friends. We’ll definitely give it another try next time we’re in Lima, and sample some of the main dishes. I would recommend it.

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