la vida comida

food. life.

Category: Peru (page 1 of 2)

Manjar Blanco 2016 Redux

Hello again, after (another) long hiatus! I have been so thrilled to watch Peruvian cuisine gain attention and interest over the last year. I always knew that once the creativity, simple elegance, and intriguing combination of history and fusion behind this fabulous cuisine came to light, the world couldn’t help but stand up and take note!

Today, I’m revisiting manjar blanco, one of my all-time favorite sweets. (Click here for my original post.) It is ubiquitous in Latin America (and especially popular in Argentina and Peru): each country and region has its own name and variation – dulce de leche, arequipa, etc. It can be made with goat’s milk (as in Mexican cajeta), or coconut milk; but most versions are made with cow’s milk.

Manjar blanco is a culinary workhorse. Cook it a little less, and it becomes a rich sauce to drizzle over ice cream, crêpes, or any favorite dessert. Reduce it longer, and it can be piped into alfajores; spread in a pionono (a Peruvian jelly roll); or formed into tejas, a Peruvian truffle confection. It is also the base for suspiro de limeña, one of the most heavenly desserts on earth.

More about suspiro another time. But here’s a teaser.  😉

Manjar blanco can be a little tricky. The main issue I’ve had is occasional graininess, especially after a day or two (refrigerated or not).  Any suggestions?

I’ve seen some fresh milk recipes floating around. The ones that look more reliable advocate for four parts milk to one part sugar, by volume; high heat to boil quickly, then very low heat (and constant attention) for several hours. I did try this once. Frankly, I don’t have an entire day to devote to making condensed milk – THEN turning it into manjar blanco – when that hard work has already been done for me. (I know, all-natural, homemade, no shortcuts, etc. etc…. but I’m picking my battles here. I mean, we are making milk candy, not an organic salad, people!  🙂  That said, I’d like to make fresh goat’s milk cajeta sometime.) If you have had success with this method before, though, will you please share your results? Maybe I’ll change my tune.

Just say no to microwave manjar blanco. That’s all I’m saying.

Anyway… I generally make manjar blanco two ways. My favorite is my usual, tried-and-true method: slow-cooking condensed and evaporated milks. Every once in awhile, I’ll cook it in the unopened can (in other words, under presssure). I haven’t yet tried to make it in an actual pressure cooker – I’m fatally clumsy, and not fond of explosions. But this looks like a good recipe; I may try it sometime, if I’m ever feeling adventurous.

(An aside: Want some cool info about food science, the Maillard reaction, and dulce de leche? Click here, and here.)

Manjar blanco cooked in the can is smooth and perfect. It has little to no separated milk solids, and is completely slick and shiny. Also, there is practically no work involved: I simply make sure the water level stays high. It’s relatively thin, which makes it great as a dessert sauce. While the caramel flavor is good, it’s fairly neutral to me. And it looks a little too perfect, even store-bought.

Manjar blanco cooked in a pot requires much more care. You have to stir frequently, and watch for scorching. It does generally have some milk solid and caramel specks in it, so it’s not as smooth-looking as can-cooked manjar blanco; but I find this does not affect the texture or mouth-feel. I personally greatly prefer it. You can reduce it to the consistency you want; and it has that deep caramel flavor, that butterscotch fragrance… it’s just ambrosial.

Here, you can see the difference:

Left: manjar blanco cooked in the pot. 

Center: manjar blanco cooked in the can.

Right: caramel-flavored condensed milk, cooked in the can. (The fake caramel flavor was so gross – not even worth mentioning.)

I haven’t really changed my original manjar blanco recipe; I’ve just added some more cooking details and a few helpful tips. Experiment, and let me know which works best for you!

Buen provecho!

 

Manjar Blanco in a Can
This is the simplest way to have smooth, delicious manjar blanco - without all the stirring or mess. It does take hours - and it's not as thick or rich as manjar blanco cooked in a pot - but the only thing you need to do is keep the can covered with water. Doesn't get any easier!
Servings Prep Time
1can 5minutes
Cook Time
2hours
Servings Prep Time
1can 5minutes
Cook Time
2hours
Ingredients
  • 1can condensed milk(14 oz.)
Instructions
  1. Remove label from can. Place can, on its side, in the bottom of a very tall aluminum stock pot.
  2. Fill the pot almost to the top with room-temperature water. Place the lid tightly on the pot.
  3. Place the pot on the stove over very high heat until the water just boils.
  4. Turn the heat down to the lowest setting. Simmer gently for approximately 2 ½ hours (2 for lighter color; 3 for darker).
  5. Remove the pot from the heat, and remove the lid. Do not drain the water or remove the can.
  6. Place pot in the sink; run room-temperature (not cold) water into the pot, and gradually allow the can to come to room temperature.
  7. Do not remove the can from the pot, or handle or open the can, until it is completely cool.
  8. Let rest overnight before opening, if possible.
Recipe Notes

The can must be completely smooth, with no dents; otherwise, the can could explode.

It is extremely important to make sure the water never runs low. If the water is allowed to evaporate to the point that the can is exposed to air and not completely submerged, the change in temperature / pressure may cause the can to explode.

The can must always be covered with at least 2” of water; so it’s best to simply keep the pot filled. Be sure to check the water level at least every 15-20 minutes (set a timer!), and add hot water whenever necessary (it’s helpful to have a hot pot of water at the ready, and ladle in extra water as needed). Keeping a tight lid on the pot will help prevent evaporation.

Manjar Blanco 2016
Manjar blanco - milk caramel - can be a decadent spread for Belgian waffles, a filling for cookies or cake, a rich fruit dip... or just eat it, one huge spoonful at a time. It is well worth the effort and time - which you can spend collecting all the foods you want to put it on! The yield is determined by how much you reduce it.
Servings Prep Time
1 pint (approx.) 5 minutes
Cook Time
1.5hours
Servings Prep Time
1 pint (approx.) 5 minutes
Cook Time
1.5hours
Ingredients
  • 1can condensed milk(14 oz.)
  • 1can evaporated milk(12 oz.)
  • 1/8tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
Instructions
  1. Combine 1 Tbsp. of the evaporated milk with the baking soda in a small bowl; set aside.
  2. Place remaining milks and salt in a very tall aluminum pot. Pot should be at least 6-8 times as tall as the milk in the pot. Stir to combine.
  3. Quickly bring to a boil over high heat, stirring constantly.
  4. Stir the baking soda into the mixture very quickly with a long wooden spoon. Be careful - it will immediately foam up a great deal.
  5. Immediately turn heat down to very low, still stirring constantly.
  6. Once the mixture stops foaming and is very lightly simmering, stir very frequently (every few minutes), for approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour (depending on desired degree of caramelization and thickness).
  7. When manjar blanco holds its shape for 2-3 seconds when stirred, it can be removed from heat. (Continue to reduce for thicker / more caramelized manjar blanco.)
  8. Pour into a completely clean stainless steel bowl (use the cleanest side of the pot to pour). Do not scrape bottom or sides into bowl (scrape it into a separate bowl, if you don’t want to waste it).
  9. Cool to room temperature, then transfer to a container with an airtight lid.
Recipe Notes

Manjar blanco keeps for 3-4 days at room temperature, and longer than a week in the refrigerator. (However, it is more likely to re-crystallize and become grainy if refrigerated.)

Panchita

Criollo Peruvian cuisine

3 Stars (3 / 5)

$$

review date: 1/2/2015

Menu: Facebook 

+51 1 4478272

Calle 2 de Mayo 298, Miraflores District, Lima

My husband's sweet cousin Mili brought me, my husband, daughter, and mother-in-law to Panchita for lunch. Panchita is one of renowned chef / restauranteur Gastón Acurio's casual dining restaurants, located in the Miraflores district of Lima. It has a fun vibe, with traditional ceramics and posters of Peruvian expressions throughout. The first thing you see when you walk in is the refrigerated case of marinating meats and fish, giving the impression that Acurio means to showcase the traditional criollio Peruvian food from the outset.

Our courteous server greeted the five of us immediately, and we while we perused the large menu, we ordered drinks: passionfruit and regular pisco sours, and a pitcher of chicha morada. The sours were good, with just the right amount of pisco and egg white froth. The chicha was very subtly spiced, and not too sweet; I don’t care for it personally, but my husband and daughter really liked it.

As we had walked to our table, we’d passed the huge bread oven, a red-mosaic monstrosity with a concrete wall around it. It glared with heat and promise. We were told that all the restaurant’s breads were baked in this oven, and I could not wait to try them. We were quickly served a variety of breads and condiments on a wooden tray: a large, fluffy loaf of potato bread; two round, crusty white rolls;  an unleavened bread made of beans; and another bread made of corn.

What a disappointment.  The potato bread was sweet and cottony-soft, but nearly flavorless, and reminded me distinctly of store-bought potato bread. The other breads had a nice chewy texture, but also lacked flavor, with barely a trace of the earthy stone-hearth aroma I would have expected from that oven. Even more, I was shocked to discover (after the fact) that we had been charged $7 soles per person for the one tray of bread we’d all shared, which was never even refilled! That makes $35 soles for four rolls and one four-serving loaf of bread. That’s outrageous. Though the price is on the menu, many people (especially Americans, including myself) would just assume bread was free, especially when it’s simply plunked down on your table without a comment. (Note 7/2016: apparently this “bread tax” is a common practice in restaurants; so you may wish to check the menu or ask the server at each restaurant you visit in Peru.)

We decided to share an assortment of appetizers. We began with Piqueo Doña Pancha, a sampler plate of appetizers: anticuchos de corazón; causa; chicharrón; tamal verde; choclo a la huancaína; and a papita rellena, accompanied by salsa criolla and fried sweet potato. We all agreed that each appetizer was exceptionally good. The tamal verde – moist and delicate, full of fresh cilantro flavor – was one of the best I’ve had. The anticuchos de corazón – marinated, skewered, and grilled beef hearts – stole the show: so tender, with a taste like a cross between a ribeye steak and a mild liver, and just a slight hint of game in the aftertaste. Add hot pepper paste, spices, and smoky char from the grill… simply amazing. Try them. You won’t be sorry.

Next came Jarana Criolla, or an assortment of stewed dishes which were largely created by Peruvian African slaves: olluquito (a stew made with olluco, a root vegetable that tastes to me like a cross between white potato and cabbage); ají de gallina; carapulcra (dried potato and beef jerky stew); cau cau (tripe); sangrecita (fried beef blood); patita con maní (pig’s feet with peanut); chanfainita (an organ meat stew); and frijoles con jugo y arroz (black beans with rice). All were very good, but the star was the pig’s feet – the meat was rich and sweet, and the peanut was a perfect accompaniment. However, a few of these were extremely salty, especially the beans.

We also ordered a plate of anticuchos de paiche, with tostones. Paiche is a massive South American river fish that is white and sweet, much like cod (indeed, it’s sometimes called the “cod of the Amazon”); but has a bit of chewy bite to it, making it strong enough to withstand the grill. It was marinated in lime juice, pepper paste, and spices, and cooked absolutely perfectly, plucked off the grill just at the point when it was cooked through. It was juicy, bursting with flavor, yet still delicate. This was one of the best fish dishes I’ve ever eaten, bar none – and I don’t say that lightly.

My daughter ordered a plate of pesto pasta for herself; she said it was good. I tasted it and thought it was decent. (This might work for a vegetarian, as well as the breads / condiments, and possibly the bean stews – but ask which dishes are made with meat stock; I bet most are.)

For dessert, we all shared a plate of picarones, deep-fried beignets/doughnuts made of pumpkin, sweet potato, and sweet spices like cinnamon and clove. They were fresh and light, with most of its sweetness lent by the generous pouring of miel (molasses syrup). It was a perfect end to our lunch.

The service was excellent: friendly, knowledgeable, prompt, and unobtrusive. They cheerfully obliged our every request, even when I (very annoyingly) asked to take pictures of everyone and everything. They even took pictures on each of our phones.

Overall I found Panchita provided a very good meal for a reasonable price (with the exception of the bread). The entire meal for 5 people, including drinks, came to just over $400 soles – about $130 American dollars. Now that is a bargain, even with a steep “bread tax.”

Keep in mind this is more casual fare. It’s a good place for a fun lunch or happy hour with friends. We’ll definitely give it another try next time we’re in Lima, and sample some of the main dishes. I would recommend it.

I can hardly believe so much time has passed since I’ve written! I’m so glad to be back. It’s been such a busy year for me: I’m just two semesters shy of my food studies master’s degree, which has been very hard but rewarding research work. I’m also working as a pastry chef at a gourmet market, as well as a private cake artist (and participated in a cake competition earlier this year as well). But I will be posting regularly from now on – really, I promise!

Today’s my birthday, which I’m pleased to find falls during Mistura (September 5-15 this year). Quite a nice birthday present, I think! It’s my mission to attend next year.

Mistura is a Peruvian culinary festival which was created by APEGA (Peru’s Gastronomic Society, which promotes Peruvian biodiversity, farming, and cuisine). APEGA and Mistura seek to educate the public about Peru’s incredible and unique food products, which immediately translates into its tremendous gastronomic diversity. In that vein, Mistura’s chef-participants showcase Peruvian agricultural and food products in creative and exciting ways.

At Mistura, Peru’s culinary “worlds” are represented by ingredients or dishes (like anticucho, ceviche, and sandwiches) – and regional / fusion cuisines (including north, south, Amazon, chifa, and nikkei). Quinoa, the Andean superfood, local fish / seafood products, and chocolate took center stage this year.

Peruvian cuisine is dynamic, innovative fusion at its best – and the culinary world is finally starting to take note! Mistura is fast becoming a culinary destination for top chefs and international foodies. The festival has grown in recent years to include culinary exhibits from around the world. Celebrated international chefs headlined food presentations, including (of course) Gastón Acurio, Ferran Adrià, José Andrés, Rick Bayless, Alain Ducasse, and René Redzepi.

One aside: I was greatly disappointed to learn there was not one female chef included in the presentations. I sincerely hope this inexplicable exclusion is corrected in Mistura 2014. However, chef Milagros Herrera was selected as Mistura’s Best Pastry Chef 2014, whose quinoa crème brûlée thrilled the judges. Read about it here:

This beautiful English-language video about Mistura was shared with me by filmmakers Mo Stoebe and Katja Kulenkampff. (It is also posted on their stunning blog, Cut and Cue.) It showcases renowned chefs Gaston Acurio, Tony Custer, and René Redzepi sharing their views about Peruvian cuisine, food culture, and the Mistura festival. It perfectly captures both the visual beauty of Peruvian food and the cultural essence of the cuisine – and especially how Peruvian food can become a vehicle for social change.

Mo and Katja, thanks so much for this enlightening glimpse into Mistura and Peruvian food life!

 

Want to learn more about Mistura? Check out the links below.

¡buen provecho! ¡hasta pronto!

Link to the official Mistura website (español)…

http://mistura.pe/

…and its official Facebook page (español):

https://www.facebook.com/misturaperu

Eater.com’s Mistura review (English):

http://eater.com/archives/2013/09/10/hangover-observations-from-mistura-2013-in-lima-peru.php

Peru This Week.com’s Mistura writeup (English):

http://www.peruthisweek.com/food-everything-you-need-to-know-about-mistura-2013-100774

Latina Lista.com (English):

http://latinalista.com/2013/09/international-foodies-turn-their-attention-to-perus-mistura

Peruvian newspaper El Comercio’s website, with Mistura 2013 news (español):

http://elcomercio.pe/gastronomia/?tag=mistura&ref=ecb

El Comercio’s aerial camera view of Mistura (español):

http://elcomercio.pe/gastronomia/1628820/noticia-feria-mistura-2013-desde-lente-dronevideo

Arroz con Leche / Rice Pudding

My mother-in-law, Evelina Ramos Tremolada, is the most amazing Peruvian cook. She grew up on a coffee plantation in the town of Chanchamayo, in the central Andean highland province of Junín. Chanchamayo is an area where many Italian immigrants have settled for the last 100 years. Evelina’s own father, Félix Tremolada, was originally from Milan.

Mamá Evelina, teaching the next generation of Ramos chefs!

Evelina has also lived in Piura and Lima, and has traveled all over Peru. She can make any Peruvian specialty, from any region – including chifa, ceviche, Italian-Peruvian food unique to her family and town, traditional Andean dishes, and other national favorites – and every single one is absolutely delicious. When she comes to visit us, we are treated to a vast array of dishes: secos, lomo saltado, milanesa, rice dishes, empanadas, tamales, and – perhaps most anticipated of all – her arroz con leche. The four of us can polish off an entire batch in one evening. She has to make it two or three times per visit, just to keep up with demand!

Lucky me: my very generous and patient suegra Mamá Evelina has been sharing some of her most prized recipes with me! I have learned so much from just watching her cook; and I am so thrilled to reap the benefits of her extensive Peruvian culinary expertise. During this visit, she has walked me through several of her most famous dishes, and given me tons of hints and tips. Her arroz con leche recipe is just a fraction of the knowledge I’ve gleaned from her during this visit.

My first experience with (edible) rice pudding was when I was the pastry chef at Zinc. We made brûleéd coconut-jasmine rice pudding, Chef Denise Appel’s creation. Before then, I’d only seen rice pudding in massive bowls at the diner, or little plastic tubs in the supermarket; I tried it once, and found it gelatinous, gloppy, and cardboard-flavored. I couldn’t bring myself to eat it again. But Zinc’s creamy, fragrant jasmine rice, enriched with coconut milk and a burnt sugar crust, changed my mind in a split second.

Rice pudding is found in a vast majority of world cuisines, as rice became nearly universally widespread throughout the Old World in antiquity. Thought to have originated in India, rice pudding was originally used to aid digestion and thicken other dishes; it evolved largely into a sweet dessert or porridge. Rice was introduced to Europe through Arab-occupied Spain and Sicily; then exported to Latin America by the Spanish conquistadores, where it became an indispensable component of the food culture.

Most Latin American rice puddings include sweetened milk, cinnamon, and citrus or coconut. I’ve since tried several different rice pudding versions; and while I admit I’m slightly biased – and really love Zinc’s – this is truly my favorite. I think that the pisco-soaked raisins add such a delicious flavor that I would advise against omitting them – and I’m not a “raisin person.”

Muchas gracias, Mamá Evelina, for sharing your incredible food with us!

 

Arroz con Leche / Rice Pudding
Servings Prep Time
8-10people 15minutes
Cook Time
1.25hours
Servings Prep Time
8-10people 15minutes
Cook Time
1.25hours
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2cups white rice,short grain
  • 3cups water(and extra, as needed)
  • 2each cinnamon sticks
  • 1each vanilla bean,split
  • 14 oz. evaporated milk(1 can)
  • 14oz. condensed milk(1 can, + up to one more can, to taste)
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1/4cup granulated(to taste)
  • 1cup raisins
  • 1/2cup pisco(enough to cover raisins)
  • fewdashes Cinnamon, ground(for garnish)
Instructions
  1. Macerate the raisins in the pisco until very soft and plump (preferably overnight).
  2. Place the rice in a fine colander or sieve; rinse under cold water until the water runs clear.
  3. Bring the water to a boil in a heavy-bottomed pot. Add the rice; stir until the water boils again. Do not cover.
  4. Split the vanilla bean down the middle, then scrape the pulp into the rice. Add the vanilla bean itself and cinnamon stick.
  5. Turn down the heat to a simmer. Stir frequently, scraping the bottom of the pot. Cook until the rice is thoroughly cooked and very soft (about 20-30 minutes). If the rice is not tender after 30 minutes, add water (1/2 cup or so at a time), and cook until soft.
  6. Add one can each of evaporated and condensed milk, and the whole milk. Stir to combine. Bring the mixture to a boil again, then turn heat back down to low.
  7. Drain the raisins and add (if using). Reserve the pisco. Cook for another 15 minutes or so
  8. Taste, and add up to 1 more can (a few tablespoons at a time) of condensed milk until the desired sweetness is reached. If you would like it to be sweeter, you can add granulated sugar (to taste - a teaspoon or so at a time). Also, can may also add 1 to 2 Tbsps. of pisco to taste at this point, if desired.
  9. Cook for another 5-10 minutes / until mixture reaches the desired thickness (and the alcohol evaporates).
  10. Remove cinnamon sticks and vanilla bean; pour into serving bowl or airtight container. Sprinkle with ground cinnamon; cool to room temperature. Refrigerate covered until ready to serve.
Recipe Notes

Arroz con leche keeps refrigerated for up to 5 days - but I bet it won't last that long!

Copyright © 2011 la vida comida.
Recipe by Jennifer Ramos Lorson.

Chicharrón Peruano / Peruvian Braised and Fried Pork

Chicharrón (or chicharrones) is one of those ubiquitous Latin American foods: each country has its own version. Chicharrones originated in Andalucía, Spain, and thus are eaten in most Spanish-speaking countries; though many regional names and adaptations exist. Chicharrones are traditionally crispy fried cuts of pork; but meats and condiments vary by country.

In Peru, chicharrón is meat that has been boiled until the liquid evaporates and most of the fat renders out, at which point the meat fries in its own fat (basically a confit). Because of the fat content, the meat is almost always pork; but it can be made with beef, chicken or even fish (with some cooking modifications). The pork is usually boneless picnic shoulder or pork butt, cut into large chunks; but sometimes (in pricier eateries) chicharrones are made with pork ribs.

Frequently, chicharrones are made the previous night, then enjoyed for breakfast. Chicharrones can also be eaten as an appetizer or snack. When traveling between the coastal beaches and Lima proper, savvy tourists stop at the town of Lurin, where the street vendors and restaurants are famous for their huge chicharrón sandwiches – thick, crusty rolls stuffed with fried pork, sweet potato, and fresh salsa criolla, the mild onions bursting with the flavor of tangy Peruvian lime juice.

Here, I’ve made chicharrones with baby back ribs – it’s a convenient way to eat them, plus the bones add a rich flavor to the meat. Cueritos (lightly-fried pork rinds, eaten as a snack) are marinated in vinegar. My version combines the cueritos marinade with the confit technique – with very successful results, I think.

 

Chicharrón Peruano / Peruvian Braised and Fried Pork
Servings Prep Time
4-6people 1hour
Cook Time
2hours
Servings Prep Time
4-6people 1hour
Cook Time
2hours
Ingredients
  • 2 1/2 to 3pounds baby back pork ribs              
  • 3quarts water(enough to cover pork)
  • 1Tbsp. Kosher salt
  • 1 Tbsp. black pepper, ground
  • 1Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1Tbsp. cumin, ground
  • 1Tbsp. olive oilextra virgin
  • 2cloves garlicsmashed
Instructions
Mise en Place:
  1. Gather / measure all ingredients.
Rub:
  1. Combine salt, pepper, cumin, salt, garlic and vinegar to create a rub. Apply rub to ribs; marinate for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
Braising:
  1. Place ribs in a heavy-bottomed pot; fill with just enough water to cover. Add salt. Bring to a boil; then simmer, covered, for 1 hour. Add more water, if necessary.
Frying:
  1. Remove cover; allow water to evaporate. Pork will begin to begin to fry in its own fat. Fry until ribs are crispy on both sides. Drain on paper towels.
Serve:
  1. With fried sweet potato rounds and salsa criollo. Also, if desired, place pork, sweet potato, and salsa on a bun for an amazing chicharrón sandwich.

 

Copyright © 2011 la vida comida

Recipe by Jennifer Ramos Lorson.

Locro / Andean Squash Stew

Locro (ruqru in Quechua) is a pre-Colombian Incan meal that originated in the Andes Mountains. In Peru, it is a stew of pumpkin or squash, potatoes, corn and cheese (which was added after the Spanish conquest). It’s usually a winter dish; but I thought it would be perfect for this gloomy, rainy spell we’ve been enduring here in New York.

[In Ecuador, locro is a potato and cheese soup served with avocado. There is also a dish called locro in Argentina; but it is more of a meat-and-potatoes stew.]

I imagine some might turn up their noses at a “plain old squash” stew – I thought I would, too. But the hearty but clean, simple flavors shine through. I love this dish – I bet you will too!

 

Locro / Peruvian Pumpkin Stew
Servings Prep Time
4people 15minutes
Cook Time
70minutes
Servings Prep Time
4people 15minutes
Cook Time
70minutes
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup olive oilextra virgin
  • 2pounds acorn squash,peeled, large dice (about 2 small squashes)
  • 1medium yellow onionsmall dice
  • 3cloves garlicminced
  • 1Tbsp. ají amarillo paste
  • 1tsp. flour, all-purpose
  • 2medium yellow potatoespeeled, quartered
  • 8oz. peas,fresh or frozen and defrosted
  • 8oz. queso fresco(for stew)
  • 4oz. queso fresco(for garnish)
  • 2cups stock,chicken or vegetable
  • 1/2cup heavy cream(or evaporated milk)
  • 1Tbsp. butter
  • 1/2tsp. Kosher salt
  • 1/4tsp. white pepper
  • 1Tbsp. huacataypaste (or fresh, if possible)
  • 6large olives,Peruvian or kalamata, sliced
Instructions
Mise en place:
  1. Gather / measure / prep all ingredients.
Stew:
  1. Heat the oil; sauté the onion until translucent (4-5 minutes).
  2. Add the garlic and ají amarillo paste; cook for 2-3 minutes.
  3. Add the flour; stir to incorporate, and cook for one minute.
  4. Deglaze with stock, whisking constantly. Add salt and pepper.
  5. Bring to a low boil. Reduce to a simmer; then add the squash. Cook for 15-20 minutes.
  6. Add potatoes; cook for 20-25 minutes more (until potatoes are just tender).
  7. Add peas and corn; cook for 10-15 minutes.
  8. Stir in milk or cream and butter; blend. Gently fold in cheese. Adjust seasoning to taste.
  9. Serve with white rice; garnish with chopped oregano, sliced olives and cubes of cheese.
Recipe Notes

This recipe makes a pea-soupy consistency. For a thicker stew, use ½ the amount of stock and milk.

Butternut squash is particularly good substitution. Pumpkin can also be used.

This hearty stew is a great vegetarian meal option.

For a vegan locro: substitute vegan vegetable stock, tofu cheese, and almond milk; use olive or vegetable oil instead of butter.

Copyright © 2011 la vida comida.
Recipe by Jennifer Ramos Lorson.

The History of Peruvian Pisco

* For those of you who’d rather skip the history and get right to the Pisco Sour recipe – click here.!

pisco sour

Pisco is clear Peruvian grape brandy, made by distilling the fresh musts of specific varieties of grapes. It is the national spirit of both Peru and Chile. There has been an ongoing battle between Peru and Chile for credit for its creation; but it is internationally recognized as originating in Peru. Pisco probably began to be produced in Chile after its occupation of southern Peru in the late 19th century.We’ll concentrate on Peruvian pisco, which is universally believed to be the gold standard.

The name pisco itself has an interesting history. Pisqu or pissqu means “little bird” or “seagull” in the Quechua language. Legend has it that an Ica Valley tribe was renowned for its skilled potters. Chuquimanco, the tribe’s chief, saw a flock of pisqu seabirds, and was inspired to name the potters’ village after them.  This Incan tribe produced amphora-style clay vessels to store liquids, as well as to ferment chicha (corn mash beer), which is the only alcoholic beverage attributable to the pre-Colombian Incas. These vessels came to be called piskos, after the tribe that made them; this eventually evolved into the word pisco.

When the Spanish conquistadors arrived, they imposed their lifestyle upon Peru. Wine was a basic component of daily life (and the Catholic Church); so the Spanish quickly imported Iberian grapes to Peru. European black Muscatel grapes were planted throughout Peru’s southern coastal valleys in the mid-1500s. These grapes, which had been previously used to make raisins and brandy, became the grape of choice for Peruvian winemaking. Advanced Incan irrigation canals were already in place in the Ica Valley, which carried melted snow down from the Andes Mountains; as a result, viniculture was able to flourish in this hot, desert area.

These Muscatel grapes came to be known in Peru as quebranta, which means “broken-in.” As the grapes acclimatized to their new environment, they developed into a genetic mutation, becoming their own discrete variety. Quite fortuitously, this mutation rendered quebranta grapes resistant (though not immune) to the phylloxera insect that all but destroyed European grape stock in the 19th century.

quebranta grapes

Peruvian wine trade thrived; and the Ica’s capital city and main port, Pisco, bustled with wine exports. In fact, during the 1600s, Peruvian wine production became so lucrative that King Felipe II of Spain banned Peruvian wine imports altogether, to eliminate competition with Spain. Consequently, grape farmers increased production of aguardiente (fermented alcoholic beverages) throughout the Viceroyalty in the mid 16th century – especially Peruvian grape brandy. Peruvian brandy soon became popular among travelers to the region. Its popularity spread; and exports from Ica’s capital city and main port, Pisco, increased considerably. It became widely known as pisco because of the double reference (to both storage vessel and port).

Pisco even made a brief appearance in U.S. history during the California gold rush era. Ships bound for California stopped in Pisco, picking up pisco and other liquors, which they then traded in California ports. Pisco became extremely popular in San Francisco; the Bank Exchange & Billiard Room created Pisco Punch: a potent brew of pisco, pineapple and lemon or lime juice, gum Arabic, and distilled water – so potent, in fact, that several celebrated writers (including Mark Twain and Rudyard Kipling) wrote about it and helped spread its popularity, until Prohibition closed the Exchange’s doors.

So to recap: the name pisco refers to the region, the port, the clay vessels, and the beverage itself… which clearly shows pisco’s great importance to Peruvian culture.

Pisco Today

Peruvians take exceptional pride in their pisco. To preserve its quality and reputation, a series of policies and laws have regulated the production, classification and appellation of pisco from the 19th century to the present day. Today, Pisco is produced in legally designated areas of origin, and production is closely monitored. Proof is not regulated, though it is usually about 42%. Pisco must be aged for a minimum of three months in vessels that do not alter the pisco in any way, and no additives whatsoever are permitted.

There are four recognized grades of Peruvian pisco:

puro (non-aromatic)

Made primarily from Quebranta grapes (considered to be the best), but sometimes from Mollar, Common Black, or Uvina grapes.It is produced exclusively from one single variety of pisco grapes, which is indicated on the bottle label. It is the most exported and sought-after grade of pisco, as it is considered to be the highest quality.

aromático (aromatic)

Fresh musts fermented from the blending of ‘aromatic’ pisco grape varieties, such as Muscat, Italia, Torontel, and Albilla.

italia grapes

acholado (also called “half-breed”)

Made from blending any varieties of Pisco grapes, both aromatic and non-aromatic.

musto verde (green must)

Partially fermented fresh must that is distilled before the fermentation process has completely transformed all the sugars into alcohol. Not necessarily sweeter; but exceptionally smooth.

Each grade has its own unique flavor profile; but I would say that the unifying characteristics of good pisco are smoothness and clean, fresh flavors. It is so smooth that it’s difficult to taste the alcohol… which has both benefits and risks! The best piscos are meant to be sipped neat. I prefer to drink pisco in mixed cocktails (see my Pisco Sour recipe, and look for more pisco drink recipes coming soon!). I personally like puro for Pisco Sours, and aromático for fruitier drinks. Sample different varieties to see which you prefer.

Pisco does have its detractors, who say that it’s just a clear brandy… but they don’t know what they’re missing. I think it’s a truly unique addition to your beverage repertoire.  I hope you’ll give it a try!

Even though pisco is surfacing on the U.S. radar again, it can still be difficult to find in the U.S. But ask your local wine and spirit merchant – many are very willing to order special items for their customers.  Here is a list of some great Piscos – hope this helps.

Salud!

Aguadito / Hangover Soup!

Aguadito (“thin little broth”) is a very traditional Peruvian soup. It’s an incredibly aromatic and flavorful hen soup with sofrito, lots of cilantro, and a kitchen-sink list of ingredients. You may wonder why I’m posting a hot soup recipe, just as summer is getting underway here on the East Coast. Allow me to give a bit of a background explanation.

Peruvians are simply infamous for their partying lifestyle. On holidays and special occasions, the festivities can last well into the night – and often extend into the following day! Their drinking abilities are the stuff of legend. Lima is known as a clubbing and partying mecca that can be overwhelming for pathetic cheap-date lightweights (such as myself).

All those borrachos inevitably find themselves in the same rocky boat: suffering a miserable hangover. Aguadito is a well-known “morning after” cure. It has a splash of “the hair of the dog” and fiery rocoto to restore the body– and the soul – to party-ready condition once more. Revelers also scarf some down in the wee hours, to fuel their all-night carousing; it often makes its welcome appearance at sunrise, just when spirits start to sag. Aguadito helps stricken Peruvians back to their feet – and back to the club – to live and party another day.

Much of Peru is hot much (in some places, all) of the time, which makes a steaming bowl of soup seem counterintuitive. But believe it or not, consuming hot liquid and spice is believed to cool off the body by increasing sweating. Maybe aguadito helps hangover-sufferers to sweat off the alcohol toxins while rehydrating the body and restoring nutrients. Sounds like a working theory to me.

Anyway… this weekend, I’m featuring an assortment of alcoholic beverages; so I thought I would be proactive. Make this soup ahead of time. If you do overindulge, you’ll have a delicious morning-after cure on hand! Aguadito is great for whatever ails you – whether it’s the flu, a hangover… or just hunger.

Salud!

 

Aguadito / Peruvian hen soup
Servings Prep Time
8people 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
3.5hours 3hours
Servings Prep Time
8people 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
3.5hours 3hours
Ingredients
Stock:
  • 5pounds hen,whole, skin removed
  • 1/4cup vegetable oil
  • 4 1/2quarts water
  • 1large yellow onionrough chop
  • 4cloves garlicpeeled, halved
  • 2medium carrots,rough chop
  • 2stalks celery,rough chop
  • 1/4cup fresh ginger,peeled, sliced (about 1 oz. piece)
  • 1tsp. Kosher salt
  • 1/4tsp. white pepper
  • 2 bay leaf
Soup:
  • 1recipe stock and hen(as above)
  • 1Tbsp. olive oilextra virgin
  • 1/2large red onionsmall dice
  • 3cloves garlicminced
  • 1medium red bell peppersmall dice
  • 12oz. beer, lager(1 bottle)
  • 2medium yellow potatoescut in eighths
  • 1cup white rice,long grain
  • 1ear choclo or white corn,cut in
  • 1cup white hominy,drained (optional)
  • 1cup green peasfresh or frozen and defrosted
  • 1cup cilantrochopped
  • 1Tbsp. rocoto paste
  • 2tsp. Kosher salt(to taste)
Instructions
Stock:
  1. Gather / measure / prep ingredients.
  2. Thoroughly rinse hen with cold water; remove giblets. If blanching, do so now. Cool, then remove skin.
  3. Cut hen into pieces; remove the back portion and reserve for another use. Season chicken with the salt and pepper.
  4. Heat vegetable oil over medium-high heat; brown chicken on both sides. Remove from pot.
  5. Sauté onions until they just begin to color (3-4 minutes). Add carrots, and cook another 2-3 minutes. Add garlic and ginger; cook 1-2 minutes more.
  6. Lay hen on top of mirepoix vegetables. Fill pot with enough water to cover hen. Add the celery and bay leaves.
  7. Bring to a boil; then cover (but allow to vent slightly). Reduce to a low simmer.
  8. Cook until meat begins to fall off the bone (3 to 3 ½ hours). Skim scum and oil occasionally.
  9. When tender, remove hen from stock; cool. Remove the skin and shred the meat by hand.
  10. Strain stock into a separate pot. Return stock to a simmer.
Soup:
  1. While stock is simmering, prepare soup mise en place.
  2. Heat olive oil in original pot; sauté red onions until translucent.
  3. Add red pepper, rocoto paste and garlic; sauté 2-3 minutes more.
  4. Deglaze with beer. Scrape bottom with wooden spoon to release the fond (the flavorful film stuck to the bottom of the pot). Cook until the alcohol is evaporated.
  5. Add the stock to the pot; bring to a simmer.
  6. Add potatoes and rice; cook until potatoes are tender and rice is al dente (about 15 minutes). Stir occasionally.
  7. Add corn; cook until just tender, about 10 minutes.
  8. Add the minced cilantro and reserved chicken pieces; cook another 2-3 minutes.
  9. Taste; adjust salt and pepper, if necessary. Ladle soup into deep serving bowls; be sure to place a potato and a piece of choclo in each.
Recipe Notes

It may help to briefly blanch the hen in hot water to help remove the tough skin.

The hen makes a great deal of meat, even without the back. If you prefer more broth, only add half of the shredded hen; save the remainder for another purpose (like ají de gallina).

Variations

You can substitute pre-made chicken stock, and use already-cooked chicken (i.e. leftover roast, etc.).

You can also substitute a whole chicken for the hen; however, the stock cooking time will be shortened significantly (1 ½ to 2 hours).

This soup can also be made with turkey (aguadito de pavo). Replace the hen meat with 5 pounds of turkey (breast, leg and wing). Follow the recipe as is.

 

Copyright © 2011 la vida comida.

Recipe by Jennifer Ramos Lorson.

Causa Limeña / Peruvian Potato Casserole

The first time I ever ate causa, I was a newlywed, just beginning to learn about Peruvian cuisine. My husband’s brother Ricardo came to visit; I knew that in addition to being a professor, author and journalist, he is also an expert gourmet cook in his own right, and has contributed to the Spanish-language Gourmet magazine. So I was very excited that he had offered to cook for us.

But once I heard that he was making causa – and found out what it was – I was disappointed… and slightly horrified. As an American who never cared for hot mashed potatoes, I wondered how, for the sake of politeness, I was going to choke down a plate of cold lumpy mush. And even with my minimal familiarity with marital politics, I knew this would be required.

I was more a little surprised after my first bite. Causa was absolutely delicious! It was nothing like I’d imagined. It’s a perfect metaphor for Peruvian cuisine itself: it takes humble ingredients, marries them uniquely, and presents them in an entirely new light.  Muchas gracias, Tio Richard!

This is a beloved and ubiquitous Peruvian dish. There are conflicting tales of its origin. One story states that it originated in pre-Colombian times: kausay in Quechua means “what nurtures you” or “what gives you life,” which many believe was the name of an Inca meal of papa amarilla and ají amarillo.  Another story asserts that causa originated from the time of the War of the Pacific. When food for the troops ran short, Peruvian women ran from door to door, seeking supplies. Most people offered the abundant potato, along with whatever they could spare; so the women prepared the hodgepodge ingredients in a kind of sandwich, for convenience and portability. As the women fed the troops, they are said to have declared: “Por la causa!” (“For the Cause!”) Thus, according to legend, causa was born.

Whatever its origins, causa can now be found in all facets of Peruvian life – at home, in restaurants, at parties and events – with unlimited variations. I would be hard-pressed to find a more perfect summer meal than causa. Cool and refreshing, yet loaded with flavor and just a touch of spice, it matches wonderfully with a slightly sweet Riesling. Just in time for the hot weather!

This is my own version of causa limeña. It combines two of my favorite things: seafood and pisco. I urge you to give it a chance!

 

Seafood Causa
Servings Prep Time
8servings 1hour
Cook Time
55minutes
Servings Prep Time
8servings 1hour
Cook Time
55minutes
Ingredients
Potato Filling
  • 1pound yellow potatoes
  • 2Tbsp. butter
  • 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1/4cup ají amarillo paste
  • 1/4tsp. salt (to taste)
  • 1/4tsp. white pepper (to taste)
Yucca Filling
  • 1pound yucca, frozen
  • 1/2each fresh lemon juice
  • 2Tbsp. butter
  • 3Tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1/4tsp. salt (to taste)
  • 1/4 tsp. white pepper (to taste)
Seafood Filling
  • 1large red onion, minced
  • 1Tbsp. rice wine or apple cider vinegar
  • 8oz. shrimp, deveined, 31-35 count
  • 3Tbsp. butter, unsalted
  • 1/4cup (1) Pisco
  • 4fillets white fish (cod, sole, flounder)
  • 1cup crab meat, lump
  • 1/2each lemon juice, fresh
  • 1each lemon zest
  • 1cup mayonnaise, fresh
  • 1/4cup (1) rice wine vinegar
  • 1/4tsp. salt (to taste)
  • 1/4tsp. white pepper
Poaching LIquid
  • 1cup fish or vegetable stock
  • 1tsp. (2) rice wine or apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4cup (2) Pisco
  • 1each baking soda
  • 1/2tsp. Kosher salt
Garnish
  • 1recipe mayonesa de palta
  • 1whole avocado
  • 4oz. shrimp, 31-35 count, cooked
Instructions
Potato Filling:
  1. Place potatoes, skins on, in a pot; fill with enough cold salted water to cover.
  2. Bring to a boil; simmer until fork tender (about 15-20 minutes). Cool slightly, then peel.
  3. While still warm, run through a food mill or sieve, or mash with a ricer, until smooth and without lumps. You can also work by hand. (Do not process in a food processor; you will wind up with glue!)
  4. Add salt, oil, butter and ají amarillo; blend well. Set aside to cool.
Yucca Filling
  1. Place yucca in cold salted water in a pot; fill with enough cold salted water to cover. Squeeze half a lemon into the water; then add the lemon itself.
  2. Bring to a boil; simmer until fork tender (about 20-25 minutes). Cool slightly. Remove fibrous strings; discard.
  3. While still warm, run through a food mill or sieve (or mash with a ricer) until smooth and without lumps. You can also work by hand.
  4. Add salt, oil and butter; blend well. Set aside to cool.
Seafood Filling:
  1. Place minced onion in a bowl; add vinegar (1), then fill with water. Soak for 5-10 minutes; then drain.
  2. In a medium pot with a lid (or small rondeau), sauté shrimp in butter (including garnish shrimp) over medium-high heat until pink. Set aside to cool. When cool, reserve garnish shrimp; remove shells and dice the remaining shrimp.
  3. Sauté onion until soft and translucent. Deglaze with pisco (1). Taste; add salt and white pepper as desired. Prepare Mayonesa de Palta; set aside.
  4. When alcohol evaporates, add stock, vinegar (2), pisco (2), and bay leaf. Bring liquid to a simmer.
  5. Maintain heat at a very low simmer. Gently lay fish on top of onions, but make sure it is submerged in the liquid.
  6. Cover and poach fish for about 6-8 minutes / until fish is firm. Remove fish and onions from pan using a slotted spoon. (Don’t worry if it falls apart!) Drain well – squeeze out excess liquid if necessary – and allow to cool.
  7. Mix fish with diced shrimp, crab, mayonnaise, lemon juice and zest.
  8. Taste; add salt and white pepper as desired.
  9. Prepare Mayonesa de Palta; set aside.
To Assemble:
  1. Lightly grease a Pyrex dish with vegetable oil. Line it with plastic wrap, then lightly oil plastic wrap once again.
  2. Layer fillings into the dish. Start with yucca on the bottom; then seafood; then potato.
  3. Smooth each layer with an offset spatula.
  4. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 2 hours.
  5. Remove top plastic wrap; spread avocado mayonnaise evenly over the top. Refrigerate ½ hour to 1 hour more.
  6. When chilled, cut 3 x 3, to make 9 squares. Clean your knife in between each cut.
  7. Garnish with avocado slices and whole shrimp.
Recipe Notes

Tips

Court bouillon is the traditional liquid for poaching fish. But there are enough steps with this recipe already! If you poach fish frequently, and want to have court bouillon on hand (it keeps for a long time), you can find an easy recipe here.

Variations

Causa variations are limited only by the imagination! Substitute your favorite chicken or tuna salad for the seafood. For a vegetarian option, replace the seafood with diced roasted vegetables (eggplant and roasted peppers are particularly good).

For a boost of flavor, reduce the poaching liquid until there is just a small residue in the bottom of the pot. Cool, then add ½ to 1 tsp. to the seafood filling (but make sure to omit any added salt).

For a pretty presentation, lightly oil a ring mold; layer as above; remove and garnish.

 

Ají de Gallina / Spicy Peruvian Hen Stew

Ají de gallina is the quintessential Peruvian dish:  it is a perfect fusion of Andean and European cuisines. It has some roots in pre-Columbian times: the Inca people cooked a breed of chicken called the “hualpa” (which was renamed after Atahaulpa, the last Inca ruler, who was executed by the Spanish) with hot pepper.  Ají amarillo was – and still is – the most commonly used pepper in Peruvian kitchens; and it is the key flavoring ingredient in this recipe.

However, it is also related to the Spanish precursor to manjar blanco, which was a cooked dish that included milk and almonds. The Spaniards added cheese and olives. French chefs who came to Peru in the 19th century may have changed the dish into more of a creamy fricassée, possibly adding the European use of a panada as thickening agent, and shredded chicken instead of the Quechua tradition of large chunks. Native chopped peanuts replaced the almonds as well. In short, each culture made its mark; and ultimately created an entirely new dish that is now uniquely Peruvian.

Ají de gallina is a treasured national dish. Every Peruvian home cook has this recipe in his / her repertoire, and adds a personal spin.  It was my husband’s childhood favorite, and he says that it is a common favorite of many Peruvian children. His mother made it for every birthday celebration. Unfortunately, I have corrupted him: he now requests my braised beef short ribs with my top-secret mango-tamarind barbecue sauce! But that’s another post.

This recipe is traditionally made with non-egg-laying hens. Hen is older and tougher than the regular frying or roasting chickens that are commonly sold here; but is much more flavorful. You’ll need to boil the heck out of it to make it tender… but I promise, the flavor is well worth the extra time. I’m not one to promote the big-box stores… but you can often find hen in the frozen food section of that megalomaniacal corporation that starts with a “W.” If you can get a fresh hen at your local butcher or grocery store, so much the better. Use a whole roasting chicken if you must – but don’t use chicken breast! Bone chicken is essential to create a flavorful stock and moist meat.

This dish is usually served as an entrée at home, with both rice and potatoes; and as an appetizer in restaurants, with potatoes only.

* * Please note – there are several steps which require advance preparation and waiting time. * * 

Please read recipe through before beginning!

 

Ají de Gallina / Spicy Peruvian Hen Stew
Servings Prep Time
8people 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
3.5hours 3hours
Servings Prep Time
8people 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
3.5hours 3hours
Ingredients
Stock:
  • 5pound hen,
  • 2 1/2-3quarts water
  • 1large carrot,peeled and halved
  • 1large yellow onionquartered
  • 1stalk celery,halved
  • 2cloves garlic
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1Tbsp. cumin, ground
  • 1tsp. Kosher salt
  • 1/2tsp. white pepper
Stew base:
  • 1/4cup olive oilextra virgin
  • 1large yellow onionsmall dice
  • 4cloves garlicminced
  • 10slices white bread,crusts removed
  • 12oz. evaporated milk(1 can)
  • 2 1/2cups hen stock(as needed - from above recipe)
  • 1/2cup Parmesan cheesefreshly grated
  • 1/4cup ají amarillo paste
  • 1/4tsp. Kosher salt(to taste)
  • 1/8tsp. white pepper(to taste)
Garnish
  • 4medium yellow potatoes
  • 2 eggs
  • 8 olives,Peruvian or kalamata, pitted and halved
Instructions
Mise
  1. Gather / measure / prep ingredients.
Stock
  1. Remove giblets from hen; thoroughly rinse, inside and out. Place hen in a large stockpot; fill with cold water until bird is covered.
  2. Add quartered onion, carrot, celery, garlic, bay leaf, white pepper and salt; bring to a boil.
  3. Reduce heat; cover partially (allow to vent) and simmer for at least 2 ½ – 3 hours (until hen is so tender that it begins to fall off the bone, and the legs / wings can be easily pulled from the body). Periodically skim surface oil and scum off the surface of the stock. If your pot is small and hen is not completely covered with water, turn after 1 hour.
  4. * While stock is cooking, prep stew base and garnish ingredients (see below).
  5. Add the potatoes to the stock for the last 25 minutes. (Remove when fork-tender, if done before the stock.)
  6. Strain; make sure to retain the broth in a pot, and keep it hot on the stove.
  7. Remove hen, and allow to cool. Discard remainder of strained ingredients.
  8. When hen is cool, peel off the skin and discard. Remove the hen meat from the bone, and shred finely by hand.
Stew
  1. Gather / measure / prep mise en place.
  2. Cut the bread first; allow to sit out for 1-2 hours.
  3. Soak the dry bread in the milk until saturated. Place in a food processor, and purée until smooth.
  4. Heat the oil over medium heat; sauté the onion until soft and translucent (4-5 minutes). Add garlic and ají amarillo paste; sauté 2-3 more minutes.
  5. Add bread mixture; stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, cook until liquid evaporates and mix is dry.
  6. Add one ladle (½ cup) of stock at a time, stirring to prevent sticking. When liquid evaporates, add another ladle-full. Repeat, for a total of 4 ladles (or until a thick sauce consistency is reached).
  7. (Optional: at this point, you can purée the sauce, using a hand blender.)
  8. Add the cheese and the shredded hen meat. Add one more ladle of stock; mix well to combine. Remove from heat.
  9. Taste; add salt and pepper as desired. (It may not need any.) If sauce is too thick, add one more ladle of stock, and mix well.
  10. Serve gallina atop boiled plain potatoes; garnish with hard-boiled egg, black olives, and crushed peanuts or walnuts. You may also add arroz a la Peruana as a second side dish.
Recipe Notes

You can serve this as a main dish, or (in smaller portions) as an appetizer or first course.

Refrigerate or freeze the extra stock – it makes a delicious soup or stew base.

You can substitute 1 sleeve of Saltine crackers for some or all of the bread.

Evaporated milk is used in many Peruvian recipes. For a much thicker and richer sauce, substitute heavy cream for the evaporated milk.

Copyright © 2011 la vida comida.

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